Is the fairytale Chateau de Chantilly better than Versailles?

In CULTURE by Janice and George6 Comments

Move over Versailles! The Chateau de Chantilly art collection and fairytale turrets are worthy competition for the oohs and ahhs you elicit.

River cruises are a delightful way to visit sites and attractions you might not otherwise see if touring independently. We’re glad that on our recent Seine River cruise with Scenic Cruises, the Normandy itinerary included a guided tour of the Chateau de Chantilly art and palatial rooms – the chateau is as impressive as Versailles, but without the elbow-jabbing hordes of tourists.

Dating back to the 14th century, the estate (Domaine de Chantilly) last belonged privately to Henri d’Orleans, the Duke of Aumale and hugely wealthy son of the last king of France, Louise-Philippe. It’s made up of two attached buildings, one a smaller 17th century chateau in Renaissance style, with a larger 19th century building behind. The whole edifice is surrounded by a moat – look down and you can see large black carp swimming in the water.

chateau de chantilly

The Chateau de Chantilly is castle-like in its appearance, topped with turrets and encircled by a moat

Chantilly lace and…

You’ve probably heard the rock-and-roll song Chantilly Lace? France’s Chantilly district is indeed famous for its delicate Chantilly lace, along with its sweet Chantilly cream as well as horse racing (it’s home to the largest horse stables in the country, a boarding school for jockeys and even a private hospital to treat jockey-specific conditions).

The Chateau de Chantilly art collection

Less well-known – at least perhaps to visitors from outside France – is the Chateau de Chantilly. Yet it houses marvelous artworks; the collection of Chateau de Chantilly art is the second finest collection of classical paintings in France after the Louvre.

Visitors are often surprised to discover that the art gallery (Musee Conde) is home to works by the famous Italian Renaissance artists Botticelli and Titian, as well as three original Rafael paintings. Other names you might recognize represented here include Flemish painter Van Dyck, French landscape painter Corot and Ingres (who painted one of the best known images of Napolean Bonaparte).

Chateau de Chantilly artworks Rafael Three Graces

“The Three Graces” by Raphael, 1504 to 1505, is the smallest but most precious piece in the Chateau de Chantilly art collection

The Gallery of Paintings is the largest room in the chateau.

It’s absolutely splendid, with 85 paintings hung at different heights on Pompeii red walls. The canvasses are lit by natural light streaming through the soaring glass ceiling.

chateau de chantilly gallery of paintings

The Gallery of Painting is the grandest room in the Chateau de Chantilly, housing 85 precious paintings

Several Italian Renaissance masterpieces – including Raphael’s “The Madonna of Loreto” and “Simonetta Vespucci” by Piero di Cosimo – are displayed in the Rotunda at the end of this gallery.

Chateau de Chantilly artworks

“The Madonna of Loreto” by Raphael, 1509 (once thought be a copy of a lost original, restorers have determined it’s a true original)

“Simonetta Vespucci” by Piero di Cosimo, 1480; she was hailed as one of the most beautiful women in Florence in the mid-15th century – photo Domaine de Chantilly

Other smaller rooms contain lots more art, including many portraits of princes, kings, princesses and so on. (Without Facebook and email, sending out portraits was important when arranging royal marriages centuries ago, so the prospective spouse would have an idea of who they were marrying!)

And is that Marie Antoinette? Yes, there’s a large portrait of her here too.

Marie Antoinette

The ill-fated last queen of France, Marie Antoinette

The Duke of Aumale designed the arrangement of his paintings himself. He apparently liked showing his guests his art collection after a banquet in the chateau’s Gallery of Stags. No doubt they were impressed!

Chateau de Chantilly reading room

As well as having a passion for art, the Duke of Aumale loved to read, confessing in a letter to a friend: “I think I’m suffering from bibliomania!

The library or “reading room” is filled with almost 19,000 books (some 3,000 are books in German and Italian on math, botany and other scientific subjects).

chateau de chantilly library

Reading chairs in the Duke of Aumale’s library

There are also 1,500 beautiful medieval manuscripts; several are displayed in glass showcases. (Before the printing press was invented in Europe in the mid-1400s, books were handwritten; they were often colorfully decorated and illuminated with real gold and silver.) The oldest illuminated manuscript in the Chateau de Chantilly collection dates back to the 11th century.

The Duke’s legacy lives on

Sadly, the Duke of Aumale’s two sons died of yellow fever in Africa at the ages of 18 and 21. With no other living descendents, he bequeathed the Chateau de Chantilly to the learned society Institut de France on the condition that it be opened to the public and the layout of the art remain unchanged. What you see today is how it was at the time of the Duke’s death in 1897.

Photos of the Musee Conde and Chateau de Chantilly

Here are a few more photos of the wonderful Chateau de Chantilly art and architecture…

chateau de chantilly art

chateau de chantilly

How to visit the Chateau de Chantilly

  • We toured the chateau while on a Seine River cruise on the deluxe “Scenic Gem,” operated by Scenic Cruises. The guided tour was one of the included shore excursions on the Paris-to-Honfleur river cruise.
  • If you have the luxury of time, give yourself a day to appreciate all the Chateau de Chantilly art along with the estate’s grand stables and extensive gardens. We wished we had more time than the few hours we had. (But we had so many more sights to see on our cruise…)
  • For more information, refer to the Chateau de Chantilly’s detailed website.

All photos are © Janice and George Mucalov, SandInMySuitcase (except lead photo and where noted)


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We recently cruised with Scenic Cruises on assignment for various publications. Views expressed and words written are always our own.


Comments

    1. Author

      We visited Chateau de Vaux-le-Vicomte too on this Scenic Cruises river trip! Also very impressive! Too bad Nicholas Fouquet (who owned it) got tossed in prison for life by Louis XIV for building such a show-stopping place. At least it inspired Louis to build Versailles…

  1. The Chateau de Chantilly looks marvellous although I still wouldn’t say it’s grander than Versailles. Haw! Haw! But you’re right. It’s certainly in the running lol!

    ‘Love the photography. Excellent as usual!

    1. Author

      Yes, we have to admit that Versailles is still the iconic palace. Louis built it to impress – and that it certainly does! Chateau de Chantilly is more intimate (though the grounds are expansive). It’s probably because we’ve seen Versailles a couple of times (and both times were crowded) that Chateau de Chantilly made such a positive impression on us.

    1. Author

      Apparently if you live in Paris or France, you’ve likely heard of Chateau de Chantilly (or Domaine de Chantilly). But for many outsiders like us, it’s new :-).

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